18+ : Buildable Model Helmets/Mosaics/Etc

Jeremy

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There is nothing new about sets aimed at adult Star Wars fans - LEGO has been producing them for nostalgic Gen-Xers since 2000 when they released the first Ultimate Collector Series set.

These two new sets, however, are different because it's not the original Star Wars generation that are being targetted, nor smashed avocado-on-toast eating Millennial fans who appreciate a good Central Perk set, but stressed-out adults.

According to Genevieve Capa Cruz, the audience marketing strategist (yes it's a job!) at LEGO, “Adults with high-pressured jobs are telling us they’re using LEGO to disconnect from the mania of the day,” and this market, who have deep enough pockets to afford an UCS Millennium Falcon, is exactly whom LEGO have set their sights on.

Testing the waters with their LEGO Forma campaign which released a kinetic sculpture of a koi fish, LEGO is on the verge of going full retail - and what better way to launch an 18+ range that a safe bet of LEGO Star Wars sets.

75276 Stormtrooper (647 pieces)
75277 Boba Fett (625 pieces)
1584072965430.png1584073010706.png

Similar in scope to the 0.45 scaled helmets that Riddell (1986 to 2007) and Master Replicas (2002 to 2004) produced, these two new ornate Star Wars helmets come in upmarket packaging that denotes them as part of the Empire 40 collection, and each includes a display base to keep them upright.

Both will be available (though it's not believed exclusively) at Walmart, priced $59.99 each, from sometime in April onwards.
 

Jeremy

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It's only been a couple of days since we learned that the LEGO Star Wars theme will see a series of helmet-inspired displayable sets, and now comes the surprise revelation - care of Promobricks.de - that there is a third helmet.


When we first posted our speculation report on what sets LEGO would display at New York Toy Fair 2020 we noted that one of the expected April sets was still a mystery.
Additionally a fourth set is being linked to LEGO set inventory number 75274, and is expected to retail at $70. At this point, this is the full spectrum of speculation on this suspected addition to the LEGO Star Wars theme.
Now we know that the phantom set is infact a 724-piece TIE Fighter Helmet, has an RRP of US$69.99 and is a retailer exclusive.

The story's suggests that it will be released as a direct-to-consumer product through LEGO.com and their branded stores on April 19th. Other sources have added that it - at least in the USA - could also be made available through Target on May 4th.

Of course, none of this is accurate or official until LEGO provides information on the product - you can expect to find out a lot more about these helmets in about a week's time.
 

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Jeremy

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is it just me, or does this Tie helmet not look possible with Lego bricks?
too many smooth curves.
Perhaps just a demo, but one of those sets does not look like the others

I will probably pass on the Tie helmet if that is how it really looks. Needs more of a Lego look like the other glam shots.
 

Jeremy

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I will probably pass on the Tie helmet if that is how it really looks. Needs more of a Lego look like the other glam shots.
You're crazy - it's hands-down the best one!
 

Jeremy

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Over the last week or so we've seen leaked pics and sneaked teases of these new buildable helmets - and now they are officially here!
Today, in a galaxy very close to home, the LEGO unveils a new addition to its much-loved Star Wars range.
Designed to challenge even Jedi builders, the new models will provide an immersive building experience for adults, recreating the iconic shapes and authentic details of their favourite intergalactic helmets with the LEGO System in Play. When the building mission is complete, the models come with bespoke base plates and name plaques so they can be displayed at home, in the office…or anywhere else in the galaxy!

Inspired by epic villains from the Star Wars films, the new build-to-display models will be available to pre-order online and at LEGO.com before launching on April 19th priced at : US $59.99/£54.99/€59.99:

75274 TIE Fighter Pilot Buildable Model Helmet
Create the notorious contours of the TIE pilot helmet with LEGO bricks to complete this 18cm tall model and receive the glory of the Empire.


This set is exclusive to the and branded retail outlets, and can be pre-ordered now.

75276 Stormtrooper Buildable Model Helmet
Recreate the iconic look of a Stormtrooper with this striking 18cm tall model before displaying it as a tribute to the epic Galactic Empire ground force.


Available for pre-order through now, you can get one of these delivered to your door once they start to ship after April 19th.

75277 Boba Fett Buildable Model Helmet
Pay tribute to the legendary bounty hunter by recreating the distinctive shape of the Mandalorian helmet with this awesome, 21cm tall brick-built display model.


Pre-order this set now at and beat the rush on April 19th when it officially hits shelves.

These sets add to the LEGO Group’s much-loved that continues to unite fans of all ages all around the globe.

The new are the latest example of how the LEGO Group aims to inspire builders of all ages to build, rebuild and get excited by the process of creation. The new LEGO Star Wars Construction Sets will be the first products designed for those aged 18+ from the LEGO Group to be launched with a new stylish packaging designed to reflect the sophisticated nature of the creative process.

Jens Kronvold Frederiksen, LEGO Star Wars Design Director, said: “The Star Wars galaxy continues to provide us with endless opportunities to bring scenes and characters from the movies to life using LEGO bricks. The new LEGO Star Wars Helmets provide a challenging building experience but only use existing LEGO pieces to recreate the iconic contours and colours of headgear, showing what is possible with the LEGO System in Play.”

“Helmets have been a staple in Star Wars iconography since the very beginning, helping to shape the designs of some of the most notable characters in the galaxy,” said Derek Stothard, vice president of licensing at Lucasfilm. “So, it only made sense to immortalize those helmets in LEGO brick form. It’s always fun to work with the LEGO Group to create new, engaging and mentally stimulating products for builders around the globe, and we’re so excited to bring these LEGO Star Wars helmet building kits, and brand-new packaging, to our fans.”

All new products in the LEGO Group’s ranges that appeal to adults will now feature the sleek, minimalistic new design across related packaging, building instructions, exclusive content and in-store and online store design.

Genevieve Capa Cruz, Audience Strategist at the LEGO Group, commented: “For generations, children and adults alike have used the LEGO System in Play to challenge themselves creatively and we have millions of adult fans around the world who inspire us day-after-day with their intricate creations.

“Our older fans often look for building challenges related to their passions or interests and many want to display models once they have completed the build. The new stylish packaging reflects the sophisticated LEGO build process to clearly differentiate our sets that appeal to adults from those that are loved by our younger fans. The design for different products will also use cues from our older fans’ favourite films, sports or hobbies to help them choose their next challenge and get them excited to proudly display their creations when complete.”
 

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Jeremy

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!
 
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I just saw 2 of the 3 at walmart.
 

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Jeremy

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澳门网上彩票合法么LEGO BucketHeadz Reviewed
Posted by Jeremy on May 3, 2020 at 04:57 AM CST
When our favourite theme celebrated its twentieth birthday last year LEGO was made to realise that their fans and collectors had aged two decades as well, and the reasons (some might say excuses) that drove LEGO Star Wars set sales had changed too.

Trying to keep ahead of the curve, LEGO took a closer look at what fans did with their sets and came to the conclusion that the increasingly important market of adult collectors deserved some attention. The first trial products aimed at grown-ups arrived at Star Wars Celebration Chicago and San Diego Comic Con in 2019 with the release of two exclusive busts.

With the concept's launch taking place at large social events meant that LEGO couldn't be too restrictive on who they were aiming the busts at and so the sets were marked up as being suitable for 14+, a limit that enticed adult buyers but didn't discourage children from showing interest.

Collectors liked that 75227 Darth Vader Bust was made available at the LEGO booth at Celebration and during a co-ordinated period Target. The reveal of the 77901 Sith Trooper Bust was tied in with The Rise of Skywalker costume exposé that Lucasfilm hosted during the convention, and while it didn't have the immediate popular appeal that the Darth Vader bust had, it - being a convention exclusive - was snapped up by voracious collectors. The only critique fans had to share was that the distribution of 77901 Sith Trooper Bust was limited to San Diego Comic Con and, unlike the Darth Vader bust, there was no retail outlet for non-attendees to tap into.

The earliest incarnations of these helmets goes back to 2005 when Erik Varszegi, one of the model designers at LEGO, built a Darth Vader model that was used as a competition prize. Elements of this were eventually used in 75227 Darth Vader Bust, which he co-designed.

Developing high-end sets for adults is nothing new to LEGO; the Ultimate Collector's Series has been around for nearly the full lifespan of the Star Wars theme and new models - like this year's - have continually been added to the subtheme. However these large and technical sets were aimed at LEGO fans who liked the challenge of a detailed build and didn't tap the largely untouched adult Star Wars collectibles market, which is subtly different.

Looking to further develop a range of sets designed for adults who valued display over play, LEGO bumped upon a range of Star Wars collectibles that Master Replicas and Riddel had a great deal of success with during the last trilogy - scaled-down model helmets.

Having already drawn inspiration from popular spaceships, characters and locations in the Star Wars galaxy, LEGO realised that the source was filled with iconic costumes, weapons and armour and decided that the buildable model helmet was the way to progress. Model designers Niels Mølgård Frederiksen (75277 Boba Fett) and César Carvalhosa Soares (75274 TIE Fighter Pilot and 75276 Stormtrooper ), under the watchful eye of the Star Wars team's design director - Jens Kronvold Frederiksen.

Asked where the how three initial buildbale model helmets were born, César explained that they were "a natural concept that arose in some of our creative boosts and brainstorms" and added that he and Niels built sketch models of many different helmets to help them understand how to approach the new line, as well as how to determine the appropriate 0.45 scale.

"We did discuss different scales for the helmets, but decided on this size, because they are big enough to get the shape and details right, and easy to display, as they do not take up too much space." commented Jens.

Niels, who also worked on the SDCC exclusive 77901 Sith Trooper Bust, added that designing the helmets was "like sculpting in clay. You add a bit here and there, then remove some again. Try out different shape-elements and plates, to get that detail or contour you’re looking for" before sharing that his favourite aspect of co-creating this new subtheme was that it evolved organically, rather than growing through a rigid process.

Jens was clear that the intended building experience was of significant importance and "by marking them 18+ it gave us less restrictions regarding building complexity. Without these restrictions, we can make far more detailed and accurate models" meaning that the designers could use building techniques that they'd normally avoid when creating a set for a child.

The high-end allure of the new buildable helmet line starts with the packaging, and if you're the kind of person that when given a present opens the card first and takes time to appreciate the wrapping paper then the eyecatching graphics and card stock quality is going to appeal.

"We wanted to communicate that with the new style of packaging, but also with the products themselves, which are meant for display more than play." he said when asked what the new qualities the helmets offered to the over 18's market.

Quite clearly Jens is the kind of guest who would bring only the highest quality chocolates to a dinner party.

Each of the three sets begins with the same internal framework that first featured in (later used in and then ), and anyone with experience building BrickHeadz will instantly have flashbacks. The similarity between this signature line of collectible figures made of LEGO bricks and the new buildable helmet subtheme is obvious, leading some Star Wars collectors to dub them BucketHeadz.

Asked if LEGO had ever entertained the notion Niels laughed the suggestion off, saying "not that I remember, but with the humour we have in the LEGO Star Wars design team it could very well have happened."

With the skull complete the build leads on to the layered panels, and while the back and side panels are a litle repetative it is the front - or face - that allows the designer to show off their understanding of Star Wars and the skill with LEGO bricks.

While attaching the panels Jen's comment about having fewer construction limitations came to mind, because the side facets have fewer points of contact than normal and there is slightly less clutch action (aka grip) than most builders are used to. A steady hand and a touch of patience is all that's needed, so put away any thoughts of modelling cement.

75274 TIE Fighter Pilot

While this helmet's most eyecatching feature is the paired Imperial roundels situated above the visor, it is the air lines that Cesar is most proud of. Once he had settled on the overall shape of the helmet he concentrated on getting the twin hoses right before building up any detail.
"We really wanted to incorporate them in the model and so we used train wheels and flexible tubing to achieve the final result."
Curving the hoses back to connect to the base is nearly as satisfying as the effect that the printed plates of the visor's nose bridge creates.

75276 Stormtrooper

While very similar in shape and detail, the helmet of the Empire's cannon fodder is relatively simple in comparision. Following the same pattern, the build begins with the core, moves on to the curved pate, back panel, front visor and sides before finishing off with the jowly mouthpiece.

Also designed by Cesar, it was the eye slits that presented him with the biggest challenge.
"They needed to be in the right shape but also angled across the sides of the face."
His success was achieved by using sloped black elements connected by hinges to maintain the curved appearance of the helmet.

75277 Boba Fett

Varying slightly in build order, this dented helm doesn't stick to the top, sides and front formula that the other two buildable helmets followed but instead moves from one panel to another and back again - as if further building up the mystique of this mysterious bounty hunter.

Faced with the challenge of high expectations it wasn't the trademark dent or the rangefinder that presented Niels with the biggest hurdle, it was the yellow banding on the left side that kept him up at night.
"We really wanted to achieve this detail brick-built, as using stickers or decorations in that area of the helmet would have been impossible."
Once he figured out that layering the strips using the SNOT technique would work the rest of the design didn't take long to complete.

The final touch to each build is the addition of the display base and name plate, giving each one the touch of sophistication that earns it the right to a public footprint.

Each model helmet takes an hour of concentrated effort, or an hour and a half with background distractions. One word of advice: make sure your hands are clean because the smooth bricks, particularly those of 75274 TIE Fighter Pilot helmet, aren't forgiving of greasy finger tips.

While the finished models don't rise to - much less above - the standard set by the Ultimate Collector's Series sets, they do provide a very accessible product to the collector who wants to liven up the background of their home office in time for the next Zoom meeting. And with their $59.99 price point they are far more affordable, giving encouragement to the cautiousStar Wars collector who wants to make a casual foray into LEGO without disappearing down a rabbit hole.

When asked what other helmets would you like to see next, Niels happily expressed that he "always liked the helmet of Boushh. AT-AT Driver is also a personal favourite of mine and when it comes to Rebel helmets it’s probably the B-Wing and Y-Wing helmet. I just love their weathered look and many different painting styles and decorations."

With rumours of a line of mosaics coming out, does the new 18+ line of LEGO sets create opportunities for replica lightsabres and blasters? Head over to our LEGO discussion forums and add your voice to the conversation.

You can buy these new and highly displayable buildable model helmets at , , and , where you can get double VIP points until May 4th.

Ordering through any of the links provided not only helps to keep Rebelscum going but it means you're staying safe at home.
 

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I think these are pretty cool and I'm interested in seeing where the Mosaic set goes. As a focus collector, a Millennium Falcon mosaic would look pretty cool on the wall.
 
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